Property Details

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19 Acres of Great Usable Land with Mountain Views

$20,000

Almost 20 acres of fantastic property in San Simon in Cochise County. Electric nearby, perfect for agriculture or grazing, or your new homestead. Site build and manufactured are both allowed. This is a very short drive from the I-10 on well maintained road yet still with stunning mountain views and tons of privacy. Come see for yourself. Seller financing available as well as conventional lenders.

Located outside of Portal, AZ (the Yosemite of Arizona), this is known for the best stargazing anywhere, rock climbing, and birdwatching in the Chiricahua Mountains. This is your very own 19+ acres piece of Southeastern Arizona paradise. Live walking distance to the mountains and hiking. This beautiful lot gives you plenty of space to live freely or venture into nearby quaint towns. Use your ATVs, ride horses, and hike for miles and miles. Wide open range for your goats, chickens, horses, llamas. If you're looking for freedom and infinite natural beauty, look no further.

Make this your livable space part time or full time. Electricity is nearby, drill your own well or haul water. No HOA1

Ask about Owner Financing.

Easily Access the land from the I-10 in San Simon

Property Information

Parcel Size

19.15

County

Cochise

State

Arizona

Nearest Cities

San Simon

Address

TBD Wood Canyon Road

Parcel Number(s)

304-04-058

Price

20000

MLS Number

6547791

Lot Square Footage

834174

Elevation

3600

Zoning

RU-4

Terrain

Flat

Subdivision

n/a

HOA

n/a

Annual Taxes

278

Road Access

Wood Canyon Rd

Road Type

Dirt

GPS Coordinates

32.214976, -109.224610

Electric

Nearby

Water

Haul or install well

Sewer

n/a

Legal Description

S2 OF LOT 2 SEC 18 14 31 19.15AC

Contact Me About This Land Today!
Contact Me About This Land Today!

Kendall M. Weesner  | Long Realty Covey Luxury Properties

Nearby Cities and Attractions

Portal, Arizona

Fort Bowie National Historic Site

Fort Bowie National Historic Site

Fort Bowie commemorates in its 1,000 acres, the story of the bitter conflict between the Chiricahua Apaches and the United States military. For more than 30 years, Fort Bowie and Apache Pass were the focal point of military operations eventually culminating in the surrender of Geronimo in 1886 and the banishment of the Chiricahuas to Florida and Alabama. It was the site of the Bascom Affair, a wagon train massacre, and the battle of Apache Pass, where a large force of Chiricahua Apaches under Mangus Colorados and Cochise fought the California Volunteers.

The remains of Fort Bowie today are carefully preserved, the adobe walls of various post buildings and the ruins of a Butterfield Stage Station. It stands as a lasting monument to the bravery and endurance of U.S. soldiers in paving the way for westward settlement and the taming of the western frontier. It also serves to give us an understanding of the “clash of cultures,” one a young emerging nation in pursuit of its “manifest destiny,” the other a valiant hunter/gatherer society fighting to preserve its existence. Apache resistance was finally crushed at Fort Bowie, and the result was the end of the Indian wars in the United States. S

Chiricahua Mountains

The Chiricahua Mountains are the largest of Arizona’s Sky Island mountain ranges and the second highest. The main crest of the mountain range resembles rolling hills atop a narrow high plateau rather than distinct mountain peaks. This relatively flat area is bounded on the east and west by steep slopes and sharply dissected canyons. Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii)reaches its southernmost limit in North America in this mountain range. The vegetation at upper elevations is dominated by ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and white fir, with the ponderosa pine evenly distributed and the other two conifers confined mostly to north-facing slopes. Small dense stands of Engelmann spruce are found on several north-facing slopes.

  • Chiricahua National Monument: This National Monument features a wonderland of rock spires eroded from layers of ash deposited by the Turkey Creek Volcanic eruption 27 million years ago.
  • Chiricahua Wilderness: The Chiricahua Wilderness is home to a fascinating diversity of both plant and animal life, as well as some of the Southwest’s most spectacular geology. This 87,700-acre wilderness covers much of the upper slopes and inner canyons of the mountain range.

Southwestern Research Station: The Southwestern Research Station is a year-round field station owned and operated by the American Museum of Natural History. Since 1955, it has served biologists, geologists, and anthropologists interested in studying the diverse environments and biotas of the Chiricahua Mountains.

Willcox, Arizona

Seeing scores of sandhill cranes – along with ducks, grebes, shorebirds, waters, and passerines – take flight from Cochise Lakes is a thrilling spectacle for anyone, not just birdwatchers. Willcox celebrates its visiting fowl – the cranes and other species migrate to the area each winter – with an annual festival, Wings Over Willcox, that draws human visitors from around the world.

The Sonoran Desert surrounding Willcox attracts hikers, cyclists, campers, golfers, and other adventure-seekers. Chiricahua National Monument has more than 20 miles of hiking trails through towering spike rock formations, along with an impressive array of desert plants and animals. Cochise Stronghold has a five-mile hiking trail, rock climbing, petroglyphs, and picnic and camping facilities.

History buffs will appreciate the area’s role in the Indian Wars of the late 1880s. Willcox is the starting point for a journey through the Magic Circle of Cochise: from the ghost town of Dos Cabezas to Apache Pass to Fort Bowie National Historic Site. Western music and movie fans flock to Willcox each year for Rex Allen Days, a tribute to the famous western movie star. The Willcox Cowboy Hall of Fame tips its hat to Willcox’s ranching influence. To learn more about the history of Apaches, the military, ranching, the railroad and mining in the Sulphur Springs Valley, check out the Chiricahua Regional Museum & Research Center.

Historic downtown Willcox is home to the oldest continually operating store in Arizona, along with antique shops, museums, locally-owned restaurants and specialty shops.