Property Details

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40 Acres by Three Mountain Ranges with so much space to Enjoy!

$40,000

Escape the city and enjoy the outdoors on these 40 acres with mountain views in three directions—Dragoon Mountains, Dos Cabezas and Chiricahua Mountains. Be ready to live with power nearby! Build your home to the wine country of Willcox and explore Tombstone and Gleeson Ghost Town and mining history. Build a home or visits on the weekends. Why not just run around or simply relax on your beautiful 40 acres? This is the perfect location!

Description

Property Information

Parcel Size

40.1

County

Cochise

State

Arizona

Nearest Cities

Pearce

Address

Doe Ranch Road 40.1 Acres Lot 30

Price

114-01-094

Legal Description

Report Of A Survey Bk2 Pg76 Lot 40 & 1/4 Int In Wellsite 50’X50’in Nw Cor Of Sene Sec 25 17 25 40.124Ac 2-08 Lv Deer Haven Ranches

Price

40000

MLS

6311952

Lot Square Footage

n/a

Elevation

Flat

Zoning

RU-4

Terrain

n/a

Subdivision

n/a

HOA

n/a

Annual Taxes

n/a

Road Access

n/a

Road Type

n/a

Coordinates

31.932801,-109.747731

Power

Electrical post on road/lot line

Water

install well

Sewer

n/a

Legal Description

Report Of A Survey Bk2 Pg76 Lot 40 & 1/4 Int In Wellsite 50’X50’in Nw Cor Of Sene Sec 25 17 25 40.124Ac 2-08 Lv Deer Haven Ranches

Payment Methods

n/a

Gas

n/a

Septic

n/a

Dimension

1,747,627

Heating

n/a

ACRES

40.1

ANNUAL TAXES

396

Nearby Cities and Attractions

Sunsites, AZ / Pearce, AZ

Pearce and Sunsites, Arizona, are adjacent unincorporated communities in the Sulphur Springs Valley of Cochise County, Arizona, United States. The two communities are often referred to as Pearce-Sunsites, Pearce/Sunsites, or Pearce Sunsites.

Pearce is located between the Cochise Stronghold, Chiricahua National Monument, and the winter Sandhill Crane refuge of Whitewater Draw making it popular for birders, history buffs, hikers, and climbers alike. At 4,400 feet of elevation, the area is also known for its milder summers which make it ideal for quality grapes and vineyards (recognized as an American Viticultural Area).[6]

Pearce is best known as a historic ghost town. Sunsites, founded in 1961, adjoins Pearce, and the Sunizona and Richland developments are nearby. 

Chiricahua Mountains

The Chiricahua Mountains are the largest of Arizona’s Sky Island mountain ranges and the second highest. The main crest of the mountain range resembles rolling hills atop a narrow high plateau rather than distinct mountain peaks. This relatively flat area is bounded on the east and west by steep slopes and sharply dissected canyons. Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii)reaches its southernmost limit in North America in this mountain range. The vegetation at upper elevations is dominated by ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and white fir, with the ponderosa pine evenly distributed and the other two conifers confined mostly to north-facing slopes. Small dense stands of Engelmann spruce are found on several north-facing slopes.

  • Chiricahua National Monument: This National Monument features a wonderland of rock spires eroded from layers of ash deposited by the Turkey Creek Volcanic eruption 27 million years ago.
  • Chiricahua Wilderness: The Chiricahua Wilderness is home to a fascinating diversity of both plant and animal life, as well as some of the Southwest’s most spectacular geology. This 87,700-acre wilderness covers much of the upper slopes and inner canyons of the mountain range.

Southwestern Research Station: The Southwestern Research Station is a year-round field station owned and operated by the American Museum of Natural History. Since 1955, it has served biologists, geologists, and anthropologists interested in studying the diverse environments and biotas of the Chiricahua Mountains.

Dos Cabezas Peaks

Dos Cabezas Peaks

The Dos Cabezas (“Two Heads”) Peaks are two dramatic rock outcrops that top the Dos Cabezas Mountains in southeast Arizona, between the city of Willcox and the Chiricahua Mountains. The notable summit is easily visible from Interstate-10 in southeast Arizona, with the best access coming from the north and west via the city of Willcox. The USGS topographical map lists an elevation of 8,354 feet, but this is for the benchmark which is located on the northern summit. The southern summit is higher by a few feet, and this has been conclusively demonstrated by various climbers over the years. Many people will seek both summits during the outing, but range highpointers can be satisfied with the southern summit only.

Despite the imposing appearance, there is a convenient ledge and ramp system on the south face of the south summit that allows for reasonably easy access to the top. Parts of the ledge are exposed, but never too bad. There are a couple chutes higher up that are class 3 with some exposure and some awkward positioning, but most fit hikers with some bravery can easily handle these impediments. The north summit is usually achieved by dropping into the notch and up more chutes. I personally did not climb this, but others said the rock and exposure was about the same as the south face, perhaps a shade under class 4.

Most of the range is public/BLM, with a large segment of it protected as wilderness. However, the summit lies outside the wilderness boundaries. Unfortunately, most of the lower slopes and surrounding valleys are privately owned, and the landowners have little interest in allowing public access into the range. In previous years, hikers could start walking along Mascot Mine Road in the village of Dos Cabezas through an easement, but this has been shut, effectively barring access. This issue has become a point of contention, and some lawsuits have compelled at least one landowner to grudgingly allow access through organized hikes with the Southern Arizona Hiking Club, or through people with connections. Otherwise, you are out of luck, or may need to scamper on your own across these posted lands.

Dragoon Mountains

The Dragoon Mountains are a range of mountains located in Cochise County, Arizona. The range is about 25 mi long, running on an axis extending south-south east through Willcox. The name originates from the 3rd U.S. Cavalry Dragoons who battled the Chiricahua, including Cochise, during the Apache Wars. The Dragoons established posts around 1856 after the Gadsden Purchase made it a U.S. territory.

The range is south of Interstate 10, between the Whetstone Mountains to the west, and Chiricahua Mountains to the east. Higher elevations of the major ranges in the region are in the Madrean Sky Islands ecoregion, with sky island habitats.

Mount Glenn (7,520 ft)is the highest point in the range. The Little Dragoon Mountains are the continuation of the Dragoon Mountains north of Texas Canyon.

The mountains were included in the short-lived Dragoon National Forest, which was established in 1907 and combined into Coronado National Forest in 1908. The area is now included in the Douglas Ranger District.

History – The warrior Cochise and his army defeated a small force of Union soldiers here at the First Battle of Dragoon Springs but was defeated at the Second Battle of Dragoon Springs a few days later. Cochise Stronghold Memorial Park lies near Mount Glenn on the eastern slope of the range and the historic town of Tombstone can be found at the southwestern portion of the range. There are also several ghost towns in the Dragoon Mountains including Gleeson and Courtland.