Property Details

Under Contract

80 Amazing Acres of Mountain Views – Accepting Backup Offers

$64,500

Now you can own 80 acres with beautiful mountainous desert land in every direction that you look. Nestled in the heart of nature, this remarkable mountainside property offers a unique opportunity for those seeking tranquility, privacy and off-grid living. Other opportunities with this property are for hiking, hunting, wildlife watching or simply connecting with nature or even as an investment. This is perfect land to use your ATVs and outdoor toys. The land is partially fenced along the southern border.

Two parcels included with an easement in place to the back parcel, which would make this a good investment property as well as ability for parcels to be split into smaller lots. State land adjoins the property for added privacy and possible exploration. The property boasts picturesque washes that add to the scenic beauty while attracting wildlife and offering serene spots for relaxation. Embrace the acreage of beautiful rolling mountains and trees-it is your perfect getaway to explore trails and landscapes of San Bernardino Peak and nearby ranges. Recreational splendor is in your backyard. Stunning mountain views, greenery, no H.O.A. and privacy galore are what you get with this gorgeous acreage. A huge added feature…power is 1200 ft. from property so just pull it to the lot.

These 80 acres is Priced To Sell. Contact the agent, Kristen Wolfe, to find out about buying both or just one lot.

Only 12 miles from downtown Douglas and amenities, the summers are mild compared to Phoenix or Tucson, as are the winters. Explore the charming and historic nearby towns of Bisbee, Tombstone and the Willcox wineries. Portal and the Chiracahua Mountains along with New Mexico are just to the Northeast.

Cash, Traditional or 12 Months Same As Cash.

Don't miss this chance and reach our to Kristen Wolfe today at (520) 227-3331!

That’s ALOT of Acreage to Build at Least One Home and Run Free!

Property Information

Parcel Size

80 Acres

County

Cochise County

State

Arizona

Nearest Cities

Douglas City

Address

TBD Pedregosa Road

Parcel Number(s)

405-46-020 & 405-46-023

Price

64500

Lot Square Footage

3,484,800 sq ft

Elevation

4600

Zoning

RU-4

Terrain

Flat, few hills

Subdivision

N/A

HOA

N/A

Annual Taxes

610

Road Access

Pedregosa

Road Type

Dirt

GPS Coordinates

31.49987508, -109.3910466

Electric

Nearby –

Water

Install Well or Haul water

Sewer

n/a

Legal Description

REPORT OF SURVEY BK 2 PGE 88C AKA SILVER CREEK RANCH LOT 46 40.418AC SEC 21 22 29 and REPORT OF SURVEY BK 2 PGE 88C AKA SILVER CREEK RANCH LOT 43 40.458AC SEC 21 22 29

Elevation

level, gently rolling

Terrain

n/a

Subdivision

n/a

Contact Me About This Land Today!

Kristen Wolfe  | Tierra Antigua Realty

Nearby Cities and Attractions

Douglas, Arizona

Douglas Arizona is a small, charming border community with over 100 years of rich history. The city has a population of 15,000 residents and has been recently dubbed one of the nation’s best “micropolitan” areas, communities with 10,000 – 50,000 residents with superior amenities, growing economies and moderate costs of living.

Founded in 1901 and incorporated four years later, Douglas was first established as a smelter site for the thriving copper mines in Bisbee. In the late 1800’s, the area’s open, grassy lands made Douglas the perfect area for roundups for many of the region’s largest cattle ranchers. Thre valley is well known for its rich agriculture. The region also has a colorful Native American history, with names like Geromino and Cochise among the most famous Native American figures to define the southern portion of Cochise County.

Visit Douglas and see: historic landmarks including the Hotel Gadsden, the Southern Pacific Railroad Depot, the Grand Theatre, Church Square, and the first international airport in the U.S. The Douglas area is also home to the famous Slaughter Ranch as well as the San Bernardino and Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuges with over 283 different species of birds, mammals and other riparian wildlife. The city continues to play a vital role as a gateway to Mexico and the Rio Sonora region and shares a rich, cultural and economic history with its Mexican sister city, Agua Prieta.

Read about the 15 BEST THINGS TO DO IN DOUGLAS, AZ  HERE

Downtown Bisbee Arizona

As with all worthwhile treasures, Bisbee is a hidden gem tucked just beyond the point where you think you’ve gone too far as you approach Arizona’s southernmost border. In Bisbee, however, there’s no such thing as going too far; unless of course, you live more than 70 steps up on one of Bisbee’s 350 historic staircases. Recently voted “Best Historic Small Town in America” by USA Today Readers and “Frommer’s Best Places to Go in 2018, Bisbee is a unique place where the past collides with the present in a kaleidoscope of passion, art, color and kindness.

As you stroll through Bisbee’s winding, narrow streets and alleys, the town’s historic role in mining resounds through remarkably preserved architecture, museums and the underground Queen Mine Tour. Beautifully landscaped parks, cultural activities like the Bisbee Farmers Market and Arizona’s oldest baseball park, along with unique events like the Historic Home Tour, the Bisbee Stair Climb, Bisbee Pride, Mariachi Festival, Annual Chocolate Tasting, Altered Book Show, Sidepony Music Festival, and Alice in Bisbeeland embody a community dedicated to acceptance and entertainment for locals and visitors alike.Those interested in the town’s spookier side, an evening walking tour with Old Bisbee Ghost Tour will introduce the town’s dearly departed. Stay at one of Bisbee’s many comfortable hotels or bed and breakfasts, but don’t be alarmed if you find a ghost in your quarters – many of the town’s locales are rumored to be haunted.

Chiricahua Mountains

The Chiricahua Mountains are the largest of Arizona’s Sky Island mountain ranges and the second highest. The main crest of the mountain range resembles rolling hills atop a narrow high plateau rather than distinct mountain peaks. This relatively flat area is bounded on the east and west by steep slopes and sharply dissected canyons. Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii)reaches its southernmost limit in North America in this mountain range. The vegetation at upper elevations is dominated by ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and white fir, with the ponderosa pine evenly distributed and the other two conifers confined mostly to north-facing slopes. Small dense stands of Engelmann spruce are found on several north-facing slopes.

  • Chiricahua National Monument: This National Monument features a wonderland of rock spires eroded from layers of ash deposited by the Turkey Creek Volcanic eruption 27 million years ago.
  • Chiricahua Wilderness: The Chiricahua Wilderness is home to a fascinating diversity of both plant and animal life, as well as some of the Southwest’s most spectacular geology. This 87,700-acre wilderness covers much of the upper slopes and inner canyons of the mountain range.

Southwestern Research Station: The Southwestern Research Station is a year-round field station owned and operated by the American Museum of Natural History. Since 1955, it has served biologists, geologists, and anthropologists interested in studying the diverse environments and biotas of the Chiricahua Mountains.

Bisbee Mining and Historical Museum

The Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum takes you and your family back in time to the days of the Arizona Territory, telling the story of a copper-mining town’s role in the industrialization of America, a history of your grandparents’ generation. An Affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the Museum offers an interactive trip back in time for the whole family. The American Industrial revolution not fun to learn about? Think again! Why copper? Find out! The Museum offers the stories of how people reacted to family and social issues through the last 125 years and how their responses helped shape the city, the state, and the nation.

Leslie Canyon National Wildlife Refuge Blurb

The 2,765-acre refuge was established in 1988 to protect two of the eight native fish species of the Río Yaqui watershed: the Yaqui chub (Gila purpurea) and the Yaqui topminnow (Poeciliopsis sonoriensis).