Property Details

Featured For Sale

Dragoon Dream Homesite—Wonderful Views and Utilities!

$100,000

The wonderful Dragoon Mountains will be out your southeast window every day. Beautiful. This lot sits above other neighboring lots to enjoy 18 spacious acres—it's a Dragoon Dream lot.

This is an incredible chance to live on this great space surrounded by gentle hills. This land has several perfect areas to build a home, RV or camp. Hook up to water lines along with telephone lines, electric and fiber optic close to your lot. The land is partially fenced for your privacy and covered with trees to bring even more character to the land. You have plenty of area to grow gardens and bring your animals. No H.O.A.

Is outdoor adventure your passion? Hike and ride bikes, side-by-sides, horses, 4x4s and whatever else you have for fun. Get off-grid in your own adventurous outdoor land.

Get your food, supplies and amenities in Dragoon only minutes away. Gas stations are even closer. Tombstone, Sunsites and Willcox are equidistant or enjoy the big city adventures of Tucson a few hours away. Privacy, natural beauty, wildlife...all of these are yours on this property.

Fabulous

Property Information

Parcel Size

18.13

County

Cochise County

State

Arizona

Nearest Cities

Dragoon

Address

000 Sacred Rock Rd, Dragoon, AZ 85609

Parcel Number(s)

208-54-005A

Price

$100,000

MLS Number

6492320

Lot Square Footage

784,080 sq.ft

Elevation

4700

Zoning

RU-4

Terrain

Gentle hills

Subdivision

Texas Canyon Ranch

HOA

n/a

Annual Taxes

$645

Road Access

Sacred Rock Road

Road Type

Gravel

GPS Coordinates

32.04213000, -110.05480000

Electric

On neighboring lot, Phone, Fiber optic for internet

Water

Water lines

Sewer

n/a

Legal Description

LOT:10 SEC:13 UNIT:10 SEC/TWN/RNG/MER:SEC 13 TWN 16 RNG 22 TEXAS CANYON RANCH REP OF SURVEY BK4 PG99 POR LOT 10 BY M&B COM AT SW COR SAID LOT 10 THN N0DEG 14MIN W1700.02′ TO POB THN MAP REF:PM 208-54

Contact Me About This Land Today!
Contact Me About This Land Today!

Kendall M. Weesner  | Long Realty Covey Luxury Properties

Nearby Cities and Attractions

Dragoon Mountains

The Dragoon Mountains are a range of mountains located in Cochise County, Arizona. The range is about 25 mi long, running on an axis extending south-south east through Willcox. The name originates from the 3rd U.S. Cavalry Dragoons who battled the Chiricahua, including Cochise, during the Apache Wars. The Dragoons established posts around 1856 after the Gadsden Purchase made it a U.S. territory.

The range is south of Interstate 10, between the Whetstone Mountains to the west, and Chiricahua Mountains to the east. Higher elevations of the major ranges in the region are in the Madrean Sky Islands ecoregion, with sky island habitats.

Mount Glenn (7,520 ft)is the highest point in the range. The Little Dragoon Mountains are the continuation of the Dragoon Mountains north of Texas Canyon.

The mountains were included in the short-lived Dragoon National Forest, which was established in 1907 and combined into Coronado National Forest in 1908. The area is now included in the Douglas Ranger District.

History – The warrior Cochise and his army defeated a small force of Union soldiers here at the First Battle of Dragoon Springs but was defeated at the Second Battle of Dragoon Springs a few days later. Cochise Stronghold Memorial Park lies near Mount Glenn on the eastern slope of the range and the historic town of Tombstone can be found at the southwestern portion of the range. There are also several ghost towns in the Dragoon Mountains including Gleeson and Courtland.

Chiricahua Mountains

The Chiricahua Mountains are the largest of Arizona’s Sky Island mountain ranges and the second highest. The main crest of the mountain range resembles rolling hills atop a narrow high plateau rather than distinct mountain peaks. This relatively flat area is bounded on the east and west by steep slopes and sharply dissected canyons. Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmanii)reaches its southernmost limit in North America in this mountain range. The vegetation at upper elevations is dominated by ponderosa pine, Douglas-fir, and white fir, with the ponderosa pine evenly distributed and the other two conifers confined mostly to north-facing slopes. Small dense stands of Engelmann spruce are found on several north-facing slopes.

  • Chiricahua National Monument: This National Monument features a wonderland of rock spires eroded from layers of ash deposited by the Turkey Creek Volcanic eruption 27 million years ago.
  • Chiricahua Wilderness: The Chiricahua Wilderness is home to a fascinating diversity of both plant and animal life, as well as some of the Southwest’s most spectacular geology. This 87,700-acre wilderness covers much of the upper slopes and inner canyons of the mountain range.

Southwestern Research Station: The Southwestern Research Station is a year-round field station owned and operated by the American Museum of Natural History. Since 1955, it has served biologists, geologists, and anthropologists interested in studying the diverse environments and biotas of the Chiricahua Mountains.

Dos Cabezas Peaks

The Dos Cabezas (“Two Heads”) Peaks are two dramatic rock outcrops that top the Dos Cabezas Mountains in southeast Arizona, between the city of Willcox and the Chiricahua Mountains. The notable summit is easily visible from Interstate-10 in southeast Arizona, with the best access coming from the north and west via the city of Willcox. The USGS topographical map lists an elevation of 8,354 feet, but this is for the benchmark which is located on the northern summit. The southern summit is higher by a few feet, and this has been conclusively demonstrated by various climbers over the years. Many people will seek both summits during the outing, but range highpointers can be satisfied with the southern summit only.

Despite the imposing appearance, there is a convenient ledge and ramp system on the south face of the south summit that allows for reasonably easy access to the top. Parts of the ledge are exposed, but never too bad. There are a couple chutes higher up that are class 3 with some exposure and some awkward positioning, but most fit hikers with some bravery can easily handle these impediments. The north summit is usually achieved by dropping into the notch and up more chutes. I personally did not climb this, but others said the rock and exposure was about the same as the south face, perhaps a shade under class 4.

Most of the range is public/BLM, with a large segment of it protected as wilderness. However, the summit lies outside the wilderness boundaries. Unfortunately, most of the lower slopes and surrounding valleys are privately owned, and the landowners have little interest in allowing public access into the range. In previous years, hikers could start walking along Mascot Mine Road in the village of Dos Cabezas through an easement, but this has been shut, effectively barring access. This issue has become a point of contention, and some lawsuits have compelled at least one landowner to grudgingly allow access through organized hikes with the Southern Arizona Hiking Club, or through people with connections. Otherwise, you are out of luck, or may need to scamper on your own across these posted lands.

Tombstone, AZ

Fan of Western movies? Then there’s no doubt you’re already familiar with Tombstone and the infamous gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

But instead of walking in the footsteps of Kurt Russell on some Hollywood set, walk the wooden boardwalks along the dusty main drag in the real mining town of Tombstone.

After getting its start as a silver mining claim in the late-1870s, the settlement grew along with its Tough Nut Mine, becoming a bustling boomtown of the Wild West. From opera and theater to dance halls and brothels, Tombstone offered much-needed entertainment to the miners after a long shift underground. In 1886, the mines flooded and hit rock bottom, and the miners moved on to the next claim.

But the “Town Too Tough to Die” didn’t earn its nickname name for nothing.

Now a tourist hotspot, you can still hang up your cowboy hat and dust off your chaps in the numerous saloons, restaurants, and shops that line Allen Street – each building with its own story to tell. Begin your tour at the old Tombstone Courthouse, now a museum, and be a part of the action with live reenactments of the shootouts that made the town famous held on every corner – the most notable at the iconic O.K. Corral

Willcox Vineyards and Wineries

Located just one hour east of Tucson, the Willcox wine region produces 74% of the wine grapes grown in the state of Arizona. Whatever your tastes may be – Serious & Bold Reds, Vibrant & Crisp Whites, Dry, Spicy, Subtle & Food Friendly, Sweet Wines and Dessert Wines – Willcox has something for you! Explore the wines, vineyards, and tasting rooms of Willcox, along with the friendly local restaurants, hotels & RV parks, art galleries, shops, museums, & picturesque natural beauty of the Sulphur Springs Valley.